Monthly Lifestyle Buzz for July 2018

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Lifestyles Perspectives July 2018.PNG

July, 2018

Does Organic Mean Better?

When you buy organic produce, what are you getting for the money?

Reframing Money Decisions May Make Them Easier

If you put off dealing with financial matters, it may be a matter of perception.

 

Intriguing Interval Training

Why you may want to “shift gears” as you work out.

Recipe of the Month

Chicken Tzatziki Chicken Kebabs

 

 
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Does Organic Mean Better?

When you buy organic produce, what are you getting for the money?

According to Consumer Reports, organic fruits and vegetables are on average 47% more expensive than their conventionally farmed counterparts. The “organic” designation means the food has at least 95% organic ingredients (by U.S. Department of Agriculture standards) and was, presumably, grown without the use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and GMOs.

The extra expense does not reflect that the fruit or vegetable is cleaner when it reaches the grocery store or more nutritious than a non-organic fruit or vegetable. It signifies the way the produce is grown. As U.S. News reports, studies have demonstrated that non-organic food can be just as nutritious as organic food. An organic orange will probably have no more Vitamin C than a conventionally grown orange. Organic fruits and vegetables do generally have higher amounts of antioxidants and certain beneficial fatty acids, however. Organic apples, peaches, nectarines, and strawberries have less risk of pesticide contamination than non-organic ones and may be worth the added cost. Concerning avocados and pineapples, the difference is not nearly as pronounced. If the price of organic produce makes you think twice, consider establishing an organic garden at home, eating organically and inexpensively. [1,2]

 

 
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Reframing Money Decisions May Make Them Easier

If you put off dealing with financial matters, it may be a matter of perception.

Many people procrastinate when it comes to making financial decisions. Others hate dealing with them even if they make them with time to spare. A new set of University of Florida studies attempts to get at the roots of this apprehension, and the conclusion of the researchers who undertook them is certainly worth sharing.

UF researchers Amer Sala and Jane Jeongin Park examined why people put off enrollment in workplace retirement plans, investment selections, and dealing with bank and credit card statements. They found that many consumers viewed financial matters as cold and unemotional, and therefore, dull and uninviting. The more people characterized themselves as emotional thinkers (rather than analytical thinkers), the more they perceived a financial decision as an unappealing bother in their lives. When these decisions were presented as lifestyle decisions rather than money decisions, interest grew, and avoidance decreased. The researchers believe that if investment, banking, and retirement planning decisions were advertised and marketed as decisions about future lifestyle outcomes, consumers would be more engaged with the financial industry. [3]

 

 
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Intriguing Interval Training

Why you may want to “shift gears” as you work out.

If you consider yourself fit, interval training might make you fitter – and save you time as well. The basic principle of interval training involves varying the intensity and speed of your workout: you start slow, speed up, slow down again, and repeat. The entire workout may last less than ten minutes.

A typical workout involves high-intensity sit-ups, planks, jumping jacks, running, or cycling for periods of 30-45 seconds, alternating with periods of rest or low-intensity activity. The intent is to briefly shock the muscles and awaken the cardiovascular system from their norms. Recent research has affirmed that interval training can benefit the body of a fit or moderately fit person as much as a longer workout. In June, Certified (a monthly journal sponsored by the American Council of Exercise) published a study in which exercise scientists compared two groups over six weeks – one of which only engaged in interval training; the other, only in longer conventional workouts. The muscle tone and cardio benefits of the separate workout regimens were roughly the same for both groups, but the participants in the high-intensity interval training realized them in half the time as participants in the other group. [4]

 

 

Recipe of the Month

Greek Tzatziki Chicken Kebabs

Chicken & Marinade:

1.5 lbs. chicken breast (cut in cubes)
1 cup olive oil
1/2 cup fresh lemon juice
1/2 cup Greek yogurt (plain)
4 cloves of garlic
1/4 cup fresh mint leaves
2 Tbsp. fresh rosemary
1.5 Tbsp. dried oregano
1 Tbsp. red wine vinegar
1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper
Sea Salt & Black Pepper, to taste

Tzatziki Dipping Sauce:

1 cup Greek yogurt (plain)
3/4 cup cucumber (very finely diced)
1.5 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1/2 Tbsp. fresh dill, chopped fine
2.5 tsp. minced garlic
1 tsp. mint, (finely chopped)
Sea Salt & Black Pepper, to taste


Directions:

Start by preheating your oven to 410 degrees. Next, prepare the marinade for your chicken. To do this, use a food processor to blend olive oil, lemon juice, Greek yogurt, garlic, mint leaves, oregano, red wine vinegar, cayenne pepper, and a pinch of sea salt and black pepper. Then, place mixture into a sealable plastic bag, add cubed chicken to the bag, and allow to marinade in your refrigerator for a minimum of one hour (up to 12 hours).

Remove chicken from the refrigerator 10-15 minutes before you are ready to grill them and place onto skewers.

Grill the chicken for approximately 15-20 minutes (or until it reaches and internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit).

To prepare your Tzatziki sauce, simply place all ingredients in a bowl and mix well.

Serve skewers and dipping sauce together, and enjoy!

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WHO SAID IT? 
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE ANSWER:
A:
C, 19.0%. [5]


Advisory services offered through Meridian Wealth Management LLC, a Registered Investment Advisor.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty.

Citations.

1 - money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/spending/articles/2017-05-09/is-buying-organic-products-worth-it [5/9/17]
2 - thespruceeats.com/organic-food-and-money-3980856 [2/16/18]
3 - news.ufl.edu/articles/2018/06/why-we-hate-making-financial-decisions--and-what-to-do-about-it.php [6/1/18]
4 - businessinsider.com/hiit-interval-training-new-evidence-2018-5 [6/1/18]
5 - insight.factset.com/hubfs/Resources%20Section/Research%20Desk/Earnings%20Insight/EarningsInsight_060818.pdf [6/1/18]